Let the Eye Rolling Begin

skirt2Here comes October. And with it comes the once-again heightened focus on breast cancer. I am suffering eye strain just from the reports I noticed in the past two days — not from reading the reports, mind you, but from the involuntary eye-rolling that took place.

The first report correlates a woman’s skirt size with her risk of breast cancer. OK, we get it: increasing weight increases the risk, but really – skirt size? Given how arbitrary clothing sizes have become over the years, how can this be a reliable measure of anything?

In my college days, I wore a size 8 skirt. Though neither my height nor my weight have changed much in the 30-some years since then, I seem to have dropped a number of skirt sizes, and still somehow ended up with breast cancer. So here’s the conundrum. If clothing sizes for women have been decreasing over the years (so we can all feel better about ourselves), just what does it mean to say that increasing skirt sizes heighten a woman’s risk of breast cancer? The implication is not flattering.

One of the authors of this report says, “We were pleased to find an association between skirt size change, which is easy to recall, and breast cancer risk in post-menopausal women.”

Pleased to find? Easy to recall? Is there some part of a woman’s brain that automatically records her skirt sizes over the years? Would the authors have been displeased if they found no correlation? Do we really need to take this approach — focus women’s attention even more on body image, which is reflected, in this case, by clothing size?

Plenty of studies already document the association of increasing weight with increasing risk of breast cancer for post-menopausal women, so this report is nothing new. But being overweight before menopause seems to lower the risk of breast cancer, so this study makes even less sense. (It’s OK to be fat till you hit menopause? As if any of us knows when that’s going to happen.) And there’s no mention of the similar pattern seen in men who develop breast cancer, whose increasing weight also puts them at risk. Maybe that’s because, unless they wear kilts, they don’t know their skirt size.

“It’s a nice measure for women, something they can easily relate to,” said one of the study authors.

All together now, 1..2..3…, let the eye-rolling begin.

The second report, yet another study of alcohol consumption and the risk of breast cancer, comes from Canada. This study concludes that “Women who have as little as two drinks a day are at an increased risk of breast cancer. . .Those women — classified as low-level drinkers — are 8.5 per cent more likely to develop breast cancer than if they had abstained from alcohol, the study says. Hazardous drinkers, who have more than three drinks a day, face a 37 per cent risk increase.”

Photo courtesy of Getty

No word, however, on whether there’s any increased risk for those having more than 2 drinks but fewer than 3. (If I fill that third glass only half full, does that count?)

Again, this is not news. Dozens of studies have examined the relationship between alcohol and cancer risk (and not just breast cancer). Some have found a correlation, some have not, but even one of the authors of this study commented that “It’s hard to say in any one person that it was just alcohol” that leads to breast cancer. The news article also notes that, in Canada, “between five and 10 per cent of breast-cancer deaths are attributable to alcohol.”

Well then, what about that other 90% to 95%? It’s hard to see alcohol as a “major” risk factor – as one author of the study called it — with such skewed numbers. And what, then, do we make of a report that says having dense breast tissue is the “single greatest risk factor” women face?

What disturbs me most about these reports is the rampant splitting of hairs. Yes, weight and alcohol consumption have an influence on our health, and not just with regard to the risk of cancer. Now we can add the risks associated with a low level of vitamin D and possibly melatonin, which is tied to working night shifts and a disruption of circadian rhythms.

My point is that there is rarely just one factor at work, and the media does society no favors by randomly spotlighting isolated factors, especially the same ones over and over, to make headlines. So, instead of focusing on these recycled, guilt-inducing reports about breast cancer, I’d like to focus on some positive research currently taking place.

First, there’s the Legacy Girls Study, the goal of which is to “provide insight into the relationship between lifestyle factors, puberty and development, and breast cancer risk” in young girls. Given that the factors that lead to cancer often happen long before the disease appears, the information this study gathers should help us see how those factors interact and set the stage for disease development later on.

The second report comes from the UK, where researchers are analyzing DNA in an attempt to do away with chemotherapy treatments of cancer altogether. If they succeed in their work, they say, “We will look back in 20 years’ time, and the blockbuster chemotherapy drugs that gave you all those nasty side effects will be a thing of the past.”

Wouldn’t that be terrific?

With cancer rates in general expected to increase 57 percent in the next 20 years, it’s pretty clear that drinking less alcohol and counting dress sizes aren’t going to solve the puzzle.

October approaches. Expect to see the pink ribbons flying any day now.

I expect my eye muscles to be quite strong and flexible come November 1.

 

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The note below comes from a reader of my blog. I’m passing along this information about another women’s cancer concern at her request:

Power Morcellation May Be Doing More Harm Than Good!

Since September is Gynecological Cancer Awareness month, taking the opportunity to stay informed about possible risk factors can play a critical role in avoiding potentially harmful situations or even save lives. In the spring of 2014, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued warnings to the medical community about significant risks associated with power morcellation, a technique used in certain routine gynecological procedures.

Power morcellation uses a tubular-shaped medical device known as a power morcellator to sever tissue during procedures. The tissue is then suctioned out of the body through an abdominal incision for removal. This technique has been used in certain laparoscopic surgeries, specifically hysterectomies and myomectomies, both of which are gynecological in nature. Hysterectomies involve the removal of the uterus and/or ovaries and myomectomies is the removal of fibroid tumors from the uterus.

An unforeseen complication due to power morcellation is the inadvertent impact on undetected cancerous conditions. Women with undiagnosed reproductive cancer such as leiomyosarcoma, an aggressive and life-threatening form of uterine cancer, that undergo power morcellation are at risk of triggering an acceleration of cancer growth. Cancerous tissue may be present during the process of fragmenting targeted tissue. The fragments may then be dispersed throughout the abdomen, resulting in an exacerbation of the cancerous condition.

The FDA issued an alert to hospitals, cancer centers and medical device manufacturers, warning the medical community of the harmful consequences of using power morcellators. Heeding the warnings, Johnson & Johnson, an American manufacturer of medical devices, pharmaceuticals and other goods, recalled its manufactured power morcellators, advising customers to avoid further use of the devices and return them to the company. Johnson & Johnson does not plan to resume the manufacturing of this device due to the potentially life-threatening ramifications of its use.

Such a catastrophic outcome to what should be a simple, minimally-invasive procedure is alarming to both the medical profession and to the patients undergoing treatment. The healthcare industry is here to help not harm. Despite this effort, unfortunate circumstances do develop. Being a proactive participant in one’s own health care is critical. Research and ask questions about diagnoses and treatment options, and opt for second opinions when necessary. Tragic situations may be avoided when patients stay informed and advocate for their rights to good care. The medical community needs to do its part as well: Providing quality, thoughtful and individualized care to its patients.

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An addendum: The Scar Project

October 10, 2014

In one last attempt in this post to stem the Pink Craze of October, I’m including here a link to The SCAR Project, a site that focuses on the experiences of young women facing breast cancer.  The photos on the site are moving, but not for the faint of heart.  If you’d like to donate to a worthy way to help document and, we hope, change the experiences of young women with this disease, whose numbers are growing worldwide, boycott the Susan G. Komen marketing ploy of pink drill bits and give to this project.

 

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2 Responses to “Let the Eye Rolling Begin”

  1. Dee Freeman Says:

    All you need to do is look at you and me and throw this research into the “You spent how much on this research!?!?!!” My eyes are way up in my head.

    Sent from my iPad

    >

  2. Cancer Curmudgeon Says:

    Thank you! So frustrated with repeated studies and “news” of alcohol & weight and the association with cancers. Why aren’t other causes studied and talked about (oh I know the reasons, it is easier to blame individuals and make them feel like they have control, blah blah blah). Cancer is complex and the media does the public no favors with these simplified headlines.


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