Starbucks, Sins, and the Lies about Breast Cancer

I was talking yesterday with friends about the headline news that Starbucks is giving their employees free tuition to attend college.

At first glance, this seems like a fantastic move, exactly the sort of thing corporations ought to do for their low-paid employees, the ones who do the hard work that guarantees those high executive salaries.  But the fine print of the agreement divulges the lie of the headline.  The tuition certainly isn’t free, and it’s not actually being paid by Starbucks. The more we dig below the glossy surface of the story, the more this “deal” looks like a marketing ploy by Starbucks and Arizona State University. So it turns out that the initial announcement and headlines were, essentially, a lie.

And so I got to thinking, what sorts of lies lurk under the surface of the news we read about breast cancer?

When it comes to lies, there are two kinds: lies of commission and lies of omission. Lies of commission are deliberate falsehoods told to cover up the truth.  Lies of omission neglect to disclose (or maliciously withhold) information and thus reshape the truth. The Starbucks story is an example of both – a headline that gives a false impression, and a withholding of details that disclose the full picture.

When it comes to breast cancer, the lies tend to be ones of omission rather than commission, and they are not usually intended to be malicious. Part of the problem in reporting on breast cancer is that the story is too wide and deep to be covered in the space of a computer screen.

The first lie of omission is that breast cancer is one disease. To date, researchers have defined 6 major types of breast cancer. These groups are then divided into many subtypes according to hormone receptivity, cell type, and other factors. Unfortunately, the information published about breast cancer in the mainstream media implies that all women with breast cancer are in the same boat, rowing with the same oar, dealing with the same disease, which is simply not true. Most studies are done on women with hormone positive cancers, which leaves people like me (with the triple negative variety) and those with other types (inflammatory, lobular, DCIS, etc.) out of the picture. Together, we make up as much as 25% to 30% of breast cancer patients, but yet the focus of news is on the hormones.

Now, take a look at the list of risk factors for breast cancer currently available on the Mayo Clinic website. (This list has changed significantly since I first was diagnosed 5 years ago.) Mayo is a highly regarded institution, and rightfully so, but even a perusal of the solid information presented here inadvertently introduces the sin of omission.

The fourth and fifth items on the list are a family history of breast cancer (mother, sister or daughter) and a genetic mutation. But neither of these items mentions the male side of the equation – men with breast or prostate cancer.  The genetic mutations that can lead to breast cancer in women can also lead to breast and prostate cancer in men. So to focus only on female relatives is to omit the real possibility that the genetic defect can come to you through your dad.

But the bigger lie here is the impression that many breast cancers are hereditary and this lie is heightened by celebrities who are opting for preventive mastectomies. In fact, 85% to 90% of breast cancers are *not* hereditary.

This list also says nothing about breast density, even though legislation in 17 states now requires doctors to tell women that they have dense breast tissue. We now know that mammograms, already questionable as an effective means of screening, are even less effective in finding tumors in dense tissue, and there is a suggestion that dense tissue itself might be a risk factor. The controversy on this topic will continue, and Dr. Susan Love interprets the current situation well.

The list also says nothing about the use of oral contraceptives, which has been a complex and controversial topic for a long time. Some studies have found a connection between use of the pill and breast cancer; some have not. Because of the changing nature of birth control pills over the years, research on the effects is rather like shooting arrows at a moving target.  Still, the question is worth addressing, in light of a recent study.

The Mayo list does raise the issue of childbearing, another area clouded with complexity. According to the list, having children late in life or not at all is a risk factor. But the finer points of this factor are explained by the Komen Foundation as follows:

“In general, women who have given birth to more than one child have a lower risk of breast cancer than women who have never given birth. However, women may not get this protective benefit of childbearing for triple negative breast cancers. On the other hand, although having a child at a later age tends to increase the risk of breast cancer, it does not appear to increase the risk of triple negative cancers.”

So it seems this risk factor might not actually apply in many cases, and so,  out of necessity, the site concludes by saying “these topics are under active study.”

There are some unusual omissions from the Mayo list: that risk increases with height, and that cancer occurs slightly more often in the left breast than the right.

Further down the Mayo Clinic’s risk list is exposure to radiation as a treatment during childhood.  The sin of omission here concerns the radiation women are subjected to through mammography. Most of the current research still indicates that the amount of radiation from mammograms is not of concern, even cumulatively. So this omission actually works against women’s peace of mind.

With regard to risk factors, the biggest lie of omission is that any of these lists is comprehensive. (The Mayo list does at least state that many women who develop breast cancer have no known risk factors.) It’s easy to assume that, if none of these factors fit you, you’re safe.  That’s what I thought when those telltale signs showed up in me. Before my diagnosis, I had only two of the risk factors on this current list. And of the risk factors for triple negative cancer – younger age, African American heritage, genetic mutation, obesity – I have none. As a short, slender, middle-aged, white woman with no previous or family history or genetic mutation, who has eaten well and exercised for years, with normal hormonal changes and not taking HRT, I was not a likely candidate for breast cancer, much less the triple-negative variety. And I know of many other women in this same boat with me – not at obvious risk.

So here’s the obvious point:  if you’re female, you’re at risk.

Another lie is that women can prevent breast cancer through the hat trick of diet, exercise, and taking tamoxifen as a preventive, which implies that we have more control over the development of breast cancer than I believe we do. If you read only the headline and lede of this article, you’re given the impression that it’s easy — eat well, exercise, and take tamoxifen if you’re at high risk. The article never mentions that there are likely environmental and chemical influences at work, things that are out of control, things that Rachel Carson – who herself died of breast cancer — warned us of back in 1962. The organization that bears the name of her landmark book makes those environmental threats clear.

The underlying message with this disease is that it is somehow the individual’s fault if she gets cancer, that cancer is out there and it’s just up to us to figure out how to avoid it, like a pothole in the road. This continues our “do-it-yourself” and “blame the victim” ways of thinking. Although we do generally have control over how we live, there has been a constant focus on diagnosis and treatment, with more and more tips for prevention – all of which is valuable. But this approach omits a clearer focus on the causes and what we’re doing collectively, at the societal, environmental, and political levels, that leads to harm.

Medical researchers do the best they can to find the answers to our many health problems. But much of this research takes years and, because it usually takes place in hindsight, after we’ve defined the problems, it is at best always a step or two behind reality.  Despite what researchers actually do find and accomplish, when this information is brought to light by the media, it is often skewed to make headlines or garner hits on a website. The ever-increasing pressure for media to be first to the story means that the critical and often the most important news is passed over because it isn’t easily carved into the crystal of a sound bite.

To avoid the sins, whether of omission or commission, it’s up to us to read between the lines and ask what’s missing from the information published about cancer, breast cancer, and even Starbucks.

***

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3 Responses to “Starbucks, Sins, and the Lies about Breast Cancer”

  1. Starbucks, Sins, and the Lies about Breast Cancer | Gaia Gazette Says:

    […] Source: Starbucks, Sins, and the Lies about Breast Cancer […]

  2. Julie Yamamoto Says:

    On reader commented privately “Maybe the entire subject is just soooo overwhelming that no one is actually capable of seeing it in totality?”

    The various researchers may see the whole picture but the expanse is definitely a problem. The topic is huge and getting bigger with every new study. But that’s exactly why I think the news and other disseminators of information to the masses should make clear which part of the story they’re covering. It’s not possible to cover all the fine details, but it IS possible to say “this study applies only to women with hormone positive breast cancers.” Or, “even if diet, exercise and other preventives can cut the cancer rates in half, we still don’t know what causes the other half….”

  3. Mireille Parker Says:

    Hello Julie!

    I am writing to pass on details of an interview series I am organising which starts Sept 22nd.

    It’s called Healthy and Powerfully Feminine and I am interviewing 10 women with unique experiences and expertise in this area. I thought it would definitely interest your audience.

    I myself had breast cancer and I am also interviewing Susan Gonzalez, a nurse, certified in plant-based nutrition, and a stage III breast cancer survivor. She advocates for health and wellness with a focus on cancer prevention and the use of holistic healing for cancer survival. She has an Amazon best-selling book, “100 Perks of Having Cancer plus 100 Health Tips for Surviving It”, and an award winning blog, “The Savvy Sister: Simple changes for healthy living”, providing valuable tools for those wishing to live a happy and healthy life.

    Plus many more wonderful women talking about health from not only a physical but also emotional level. More details can be found here http://www.healthyandpowerfullyfeminine.com and I would so appreciate it if your community could be passed on the information.

    If you need more information or promotional material, please ask me.

    Also, I am doing a survey on Life After Breast Cancer for women whose treatment has finished.

    Are you able to pass on this link to your community? It’s just a five-minute survey :

    https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/ZXR2H8T

    Again for more details or material just let me know.

    Thank you for your help and I hope to hear from you soon.

    Best wishes,

    Mireille Parker


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